Timberland Helps Cotton Production Return to Haiti

Cotton production had largely disappeared from Haiti over the past three decades, but in recent years, a coalition of companies and non-profits has striven to bring the industry back to the impoverished nation. Last month, Timberland and the NGO Smallholders Farmers Alliance (SFA) announced they have reintroduced cotton as not only a way to help revitalize the economy, but to also claw back against ongoing deforestation that has contributed to the country’s stubborn poverty.

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Can Anyone, Even Walmart, Stem The Heat-Trapping Flood Of Nitrogen On Farms?

The Environmental Defense Fund opened an office near Walmart's headquarters in Bentonville, Ark., 10 years ago. It was part of a carefully plotted strategy to persuade the giant retailer that going green could be good for business. If it worked, it certainly could be good for the planet — Walmart's revenues are bigger than the entire economy of most countries.

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Ford, General Motors, Hormel, Marriott, Michael Kors Step Up to Stop Supply Chain Corruption

The companies, Ford, General Motors, Hormel, Marriott and Michael Kors, told the ICCR that they would adopt “no-fees” recruitment policies, which advocacy groups for years have said are crucial in reducing problems such as bonded labor, the loss of identification documents such as passports and other labor rights violations.

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EPIC: The Best Thing For Your Health And The Planet (That You've Probably Never Heard Of)

You buy local produce whenever possible, you bike and walk instead of driving, and you even started composting. You do it for your health and your family’s. But the majority of even the most conscious consumers don’t know about the holistic farming technique that could change the world. (And no, that’s not hyperbole.)

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Sustainable Food Makers Are Worried About The Future Of Whole Foods Under Amazon

Whole Foods has offered support to small farms and allowed them to make enough to be sustainable. But now that Amazon might push to lower prices and shed the “Whole Paycheck” label, those same farmers are concerned about their future.

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Cities Look to Business (Not Washington) to Build Sustainability

When it comes to building cities to withstand the ravages of age, climate change and a rapidly evolving economy, America’s mayors have probably never felt more alone. In the face of these challenges, how can cities make themselves more sustainable—and more resilient? When the solutions to the biggest problems facing modern society come with equally big price tags, how do mayors pay for them?

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France announces new five-year climate plan that puts end to “imported deforestation” of products like palm oil and soy

Ecology Minister Nicolas Hulot laid out France’s new “climate plan” which includes greater efforts to protect the world’s tropical rainforests in the Amazon, West Africa, and Southeast Asia. Hulot noted that the climate plan intends to put an end to “imported deforestation.”

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How green are Apple’s carbon-sequestering trees really?

Apple is planting a forest in Cupertino, California. When the company’s new headquarters is completed later this year, 8,000 trees, transplanted from nurseries around the state of California, will surround the donut-shaped building. The trees are meant to beautify Apple’s 176 acres. But they will also absorb atmospheric carbon?

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Supply Chain Transparency: Making the Consumer Connection for Forest Responsibility

We clear away trees to make room for development and agriculture, harvest them for paper, pulp, and palm oil and seek refuge in their remaining intact solitude. Human wellbeing depends on trees.

Forests suffer when opaque supply chains stretch across continents and oceans, isolating consumers, producers, and growers and hiding the shared stake each has in a stable resource. It is the challenge of globalization in a consumer-driven economy. So if healthy forests do so much for us, why do we continue to destroy them?

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The End of Supply “Chains”

“Supply Chains” are the current dominant concept of how all material goods are exchanged.

It is an out-dated and damaging concept, born in the time of colonization and ossified in the industrial revolution.

Consciously or unconsciously, the term “supply chain” directly recalls the early capitalist era of colonization, where traders and landowners literally used slaves in chains to supply agricultural commodities to their expanding empires.

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Sustainable business at a crossroads, again

In 2008, when MIT Sloan Management Review and the Boston Consulting Group began their sustainability research program, it was the start of the Great Recession, and pundits were predicting the end of sustainability on the assumption that executives would turn away from corporate social responsibility initiatives in favor of "making money."

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