Posts tagged land management
Turning marginal farmlands into a win for farmers and ecosystems

Many farms have areas where the ground either floods or does not retain enough water or fertilizer for crops to thrive. Such marginal lands could become useful and potentially profitable if they are planted with perennial bioenergy crops such as shrub willow and switchgrass.

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Report Shows Agroforestry’s Contribution to Several SDGs

A report by member organizations of the Agroforestry Network provides evidence of how agroforestry can contribute to implementation of nine out of the 17 SDGs, with the strongest impact potential for poverty reduction (SDG 1) and hunger alleviation (SDG 2), as well as for climate action (SDG 13) and life on land (SDG 15).

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Soil holds potential to slow global warming, Stanford researchers find

The land under our feet and the plant matter it contains could offset a significant amount of carbon emissions if managed properly. More research is needed to unlock soil’s potential to mitigate global warming, improve crop yields and increase resilience to extreme weather.

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Improving Africa’s soils to cut emissions and boost food security

How we manage soils is crucial to tackling climate change. Earth Overshoot Day aims to highlight the moment each year when our use of the planet’s resources tips into “overdraft”. The day helps to highlight why restoring landscapes, particularly soils, has benefits for food security, livelihoods and the climate.

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Grasslands' carbon storage value now quantified

When grasslands feature a wide array of plant species, they provide a variety of benefits for humans and animals, including enhanced carbon storage capacity that can be quantified economically, according to a new scientific paper co-written by a University of Wyoming researcher.

And the ability to measure the economic value of biodiversity for enhancing carbon storage could help in making decisions about land management, the paper published in the journal Science Advances concludes.

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