Posts tagged carbon sequestration
Part of the Answer to Climate Change May Be America’s Trees and Dirt, Scientists Say

When people think of potential solutions to global warming, they tend to visualize technologies like solar panels or electric cars. A new study found that better management of forests, grasslands and soils in the United States could offset as much as 21 percent of the country’s annual greenhouse gas emissions.

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Here’s What Agriculture of the Future Looks Like: The Multiple Benefits of Regenerative Agriculture Quantified

The scientific case for agricultural systems that renew rather than diminish resources is comprehensive, and research demonstrates the productivity and agronomic feasibility of such systems. Yet, economically viable real-world examples are necessary to spur acceptance and adoption of such schemes.

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Nurturing life, from the soil up

My father’s postwar generation of farmers emphasized the use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers to increase production. What these methods ignored was the need of the dirt itself. Today, we understand the cost of these practices, not only for the larger environment, but in terms of what farmers, politicians, and environmental historians loosely call soil exhaustion. 

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Soil holds potential to slow global warming, Stanford researchers find

The land under our feet and the plant matter it contains could offset a significant amount of carbon emissions if managed properly. More research is needed to unlock soil’s potential to mitigate global warming, improve crop yields and increase resilience to extreme weather.

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Why Farming is Broken (And Always Has Been)

Natural ecosystems are self-sustaining.  For at least 10,000 years, humans have disrupted those ecosystems and kept them in a continuous state of disruption in order to feed our populations. Increasingly, the scale of those agricultural disruptions threatens to permanently degrade the ecosphere upon which we depend.

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A Cheap Fix for Climate Change? Pay People Not to Chop Down Trees

The tropical forests in western Uganda, home to a dwindling population of endangered chimpanzees, are disappearing at some of the fastest rates on Earth as local people chop down trees for charcoal and to clear space for subsistence farming. Now, a team of researchers has shown that there is a surprisingly cheap and easy way to slow the pace of deforestation in Uganda: Just pay landowners small sums not to cut down their trees.

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Low-Cost Biochar Application in Tanzania Shows Astounding Increases

Since the nonprofit Radio Lifeline launched its Black Earth Project in 2012 — involving the use of biochar as a soil amendment for coffee — the returns have been overwhelmingly positive, showing dramatically increased yields and improved quality at test sites in Rwanda, and now Tanzania.

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A farm shouldn’t be a factory

Most of today’s food is produced by industrial agriculture and that’s a problem.Industrialized agriculture essentially turns farms into a factories, requiring inputs like synthetic fertilizers, chemical pesticides, large amounts of irrigation water, and fossil fuels to produce outputs like genetically modified crops (corn, soy, wheat) and livestock (meat, poultry, pork) by mechanized production means.

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Grazing to improve soil health, producer profits

Dr. Richard Teague might be considered a cowboy of a different kind. He’s not rounding up stray cattle, but rather wrangling the best management practices on ranches to help the cattle and their owners.

Teague, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research ecologist at Vernon, grew up on a farm and knows firsthand there are some unintended consequences from traditional long-standing agricultural practices that might not readily be seen.

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Restoring Degraded Land To Benefit People and Planet

Nearly half of Earth’s forests have been cleared or degraded – but we have the power to change this! WRI’s Global Restoration Initiative works with governments and international partners to inspire, enable and mobilize action to restore vitality to degraded landscapes and forests around the globe. Global Restoration Council Co-Chair Wanjira Mathai describes how restoring degraded landscapes can benefit people and planet.

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Regeneration: The Next Stage of Organic Food and Farming—And Civilization

The basic menu for a Regeneration Revolution is to unite the world’s 3 billion rural farmers, ranchers and herders with several billion health, environmental and justice-minded consumers to overturn “business as usual” and embark on a global campaign of cooperation, solidarity and regeneration.

According to food activist Vandana Shiva, “Regenerative agriculture provides answers to the soil crisis, the food crisis, the health crisis, the climate crisis, and the crisis of democracy.”

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Treating Soil A Little Differently Could Help It Store A Huge Amount Of Carbon

Climate change is a massive problem with the potential to completely reshape the world, both literally (with rising sea levels and melting glaciers) and figuratively (with the way we grow food, or the way that we handle allergies). And while the consequences caused by climate change could be huge, the solutions — transitioning to a completely fossil fuel-free economy, or geoengineering — can often seem equally daunting.

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Building soil on a large scale and going beyond permaculture with Darren Doherty of Regrarians Ltd.

This interview is with one of the designers and change makers that has most influenced my own approach to professional projects and regenerative landscape development. Darren Doherty is the founder of Regrarians Ltd. Based in Bendigo Australia and he has extensive experience in project design, development, management and training. He's worked on 6 continents and nearly 50 countries in mostly broad-acre agricultural applications.

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Beyond Organic: How Regenerative Farming Can Save Us From Global Catastrophe

A growing corps of organic, climate, environmental, social justice and peace activists are promoting a new world-changing paradigm that can potentially save us from global catastrophe. The name of this new paradigm and movement is regenerative agriculture, or more precisely regenerative food, farming and land use.

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