Unlike a Globalized Food System, Local Food Won’t Destroy the Environment

Agroecology, holistic resource management, permaculture, and regenerative agriculture. These inspiring testaments to human ingenuity and goodwill have two things in common: They involve smaller-scale farms adapted to local conditions, and they depend more on human attention and care than on energy and technology.

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Using Agroforestry to Save the Planet

According to a report by Biodiversity International, the Center for International Forestry Research, the World Agroforestry Centre, and Charles Sturt University, forests contribute to the livelihoods of more than 1.6 billion people. Yet, 30 percent of the world’s forests are used primarily for the production of wood products.

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Part of the Answer to Climate Change May Be America’s Trees and Dirt, Scientists Say

When people think of potential solutions to global warming, they tend to visualize technologies like solar panels or electric cars. A new study found that better management of forests, grasslands and soils in the United States could offset as much as 21 percent of the country’s annual greenhouse gas emissions.

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Turning marginal farmlands into a win for farmers and ecosystems

Many farms have areas where the ground either floods or does not retain enough water or fertilizer for crops to thrive. Such marginal lands could become useful and potentially profitable if they are planted with perennial bioenergy crops such as shrub willow and switchgrass.

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Report Shows Agroforestry’s Contribution to Several SDGs

A report by member organizations of the Agroforestry Network provides evidence of how agroforestry can contribute to implementation of nine out of the 17 SDGs, with the strongest impact potential for poverty reduction (SDG 1) and hunger alleviation (SDG 2), as well as for climate action (SDG 13) and life on land (SDG 15).

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Here’s What Agriculture of the Future Looks Like: The Multiple Benefits of Regenerative Agriculture Quantified

The scientific case for agricultural systems that renew rather than diminish resources is comprehensive, and research demonstrates the productivity and agronomic feasibility of such systems. Yet, economically viable real-world examples are necessary to spur acceptance and adoption of such schemes.

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